1ClickBankruptcy Home
Customer Links
 
LOG IN
CUSTOMER SUPPORT
CREDIT REPORT
ASK AN ATTORNEY
Sign up today!
Sign up for your free guide "Personal Bankruptcy in 2024" to help get a fresh start on your financial life!
  
Bankruptcy Law Center
ABOUT CHAPTER 7
HOW CHAPTER 7 WORKS
THE CHAPTER 7 DISCHARGE
ABOUT CHAPTER 13
HOW CHAPTER 13 WORKS
THE CHAPTER 13 DISCHARGE
STATE EXEMPTIONS
COURT GUIDE
ROLE OF THE TRUSTEE
BANKRUPTCY TERMS
BANKRUPTCY & TAX LIABILITY
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

Bankruptcy Court Procedures

Will I have to go to court?

In bankruptcy chapter 7 cases, you only have to go to a proceeding called the "meeting of creditors" or "341" to meet with the bankruptcy trustee and any creditor who chooses to come.

You will be notified by mail as to the time and place of the meeting, approximately 20 to 40 days after the initial filing of your bankruptcy petition.

If a husband and wife have filed a joint petition, both must attend the meeting. Your assigned trustee will be in charge of the meeting as bankruptcy judges are prohibited from attending to preserve their impartiality.

Generally this meeting will be a short and simple procedure lasting only a few minutes where you are asked basic questions about your bankruptcy filing and your financial situation. In most instances creditors rarely appear and are limited as to the questions they may ask you by the trustee.

For Chapter 13 cases you have to appear at least once for a hearing to confirm your proposed chapter 13 plan.

Occasionally, if complications arise, or if you choose to dispute a debt, you may have to appear before a judge at a hearing. If you need to go to court, you will receive notice of the court date and time from the court clerks office.


Limited Time Offer! Order our online bankruptcy software with court guide today and save 50% during our April Sale!
Learn More>>


 
Home | Why Choose Us | Get Started | Pricing | Contact | Sitemap | Privacy
©2002-2024 1ClickBankruptcy.com All rights reserved
Disclaimer: The information provided in this site is not legal advice, but general information on legal issues commonly encountered. 1ClickBankruptcy.com is a Legal Documentation software Service and not a law firm. and is not a substitute for an attorney. Your access to and use of this site is an agreement to our terms and conditions. Click Here to view the terms & conditions.